Monthly Archives: September 2016

Sibling Attitudes

relationships

Exploring sibling attitudes towards participation when the younger sibling has a severe speech and language disability

We were delighted to receive this publication from a friend and colleague, Prof Juan Bornman from Pretoria in South Africa. It reports on a study carried out with 27 typically developing children who have a younger sibling with a severe speech and language disability. Juan and her colleagues used Talking Mats to carried out an adapted structured interview to find out the views of these children on four everyday life situations identified by the WHO-ICF-CY (World Health Organisation’s International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Children and Youth Version).

The four topics were:
Communication
Domestic life
Interpersonal interaction and relationships
Major life areas.

The findings showed that the children were ‘most positive towards participation in play activities with their sibling with a disability. They were also positive towards participation in household tasks. They were less positive towards communication participation and least positive about participation in interpersonal relationships’.

The following example is taken from Juan’s publication.

juan-bornman-matThe overall findings suggest that the attitudes of the young children in the study towards participation with their younger siblings with severe speech and language disabilities were generally positive.

The article’s reference is:
Exploring sibling attitudes towards participation when the younger sibling has a severe speech and language disability. M Hansen, M Harty, J Bornman  South African Journal of Child Health 2016 Vol. 10 No. 1

To read the full publication with details of the methods used and the results click here sibling-attitudes-2016

A board game to improve communication

Communication Game

 

Delighted to introduce you to ‘The Communication Game’ : a board game for staff to improve their communication skills.

How we  listen, talk and engage with people is fundamental to the quality and effectiveness of health and social care services. Although communication underpins everything we do in a work context, it can be a difficult topic for staff to talk easily about. Add to that the possibility of service users having an additional communication support need, through reasons like stroke, learning disability or dementia, then there is much potential for things to go awry and  unfortunately, they often do. ‘Poor communication’ is cited as the most common cause of frustration in complaints about services.

The Communication Game was developed by Focus Games, NHS Education for Scotland (NES) and Talking Mats. It is a learning tool to help staff working in the health & social care sector increase their knowledge and skills around communication.  The Communication Game is fun and easy to play. It can be played with or without a facilitator, and allows staff groups to have discussions and reflect on their communication skills. It allows them the chance to learn from each other. It will improve knowledge, but more importantly enable them to think about the small steps they can make to improve their interactions.

The project grew out of two previous projects funded by NES: Making Communication Even Better and Through a Different Door. In these projects, it was recognised that the experience of services for people with a communication support need is something of a lottery. For them, there was a considerable difference in the experience of interacting with a staff member who was empathetic and able adapt to their communication, to interacting with a member of staff who was struggling and unable to adapt their interaction. Training and understanding of inclusive communication practice is key. It has been a great privilege for Talking Mats to continue to support the work of the previous 2 projects and work with Focus Games Ltd to develop The Communication Game. Support during the development process from the Stroke Association Scotland, Capability Scotland, RCSLT, Scottish Care, Communication Forum, Queen Margaret University and NHS Ayrshire & Arran SLT Department have been invaluable, and we are very grateful; also to NHS Education for Scotland for their continued input and funding.

If you are working with staff in the health and social care sector, then this will be a great resource for you. You can get The Communication Game from the Focus Games online shop. It is guaranteed to promote laughter learning, and a touch of competitive team spirit. Most importantly, it will be a catalyst to help develop staff communication, making interactions better for people with communication support needs.

 

You can find out more about the game at www.communicationgame.co.uk

, and follow the game on Twitter on @Comm_Game.

 

Get your copy at www.focusgames.com.