Research: the older fathers’ perspective

research learning disabilities

This research will explore older father carers perspectives  of caring for a son or daughter with learning disabilities. The aim of this project is to learn more about the experience of fathers who have a son or daughter with learning disabilities and how we can provide better supports and services for them in the future.

I am particularly interested in talking to fathers as mothers tend to be the focus when discussing the impact of caring on families who have a son or daughter with learning disabilities. While it is vital that we find out how to better support mothers, fathers’ role within the family and their experiences of caring are also very important. Despite this, fathers’ voices are rarely included in discussions about how service provision could be improved to meet these families’ needs.

The project focusses on older fathers (aged 60+) as I want to better understand the experiences of fathers who care for their son or daughter with learning disabilities over time. Fathers who are aged 60 and over will be able to talk about their experiences of caring at different times in their lives and how these experiences changed over time.

Fathers who participate in this project will attend an interview which lasts around one hour. I will meet fathers in their homes or at the University of Glasgow, depending on which option is more convenient for them. The interview involves discussing father’s experience of caring for their son or daughter with learning disabilities. We will discuss topics such as caring during their child’s early years, as they grew up, and more recently. We will talk about how the father’s relationship with their child and their caregiving role has changed over time, and how caring has impacted them.

 

If you think that you, or someone you know, would be interested in taking part in this project then please contact me at k.dunn.1@research.gla.ac.uk to find out more.

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